New online translator “more powerful than Google”

DeepLof the existing translation website Linguee.com, was launched online based on the principle of “deep learning” – or artificial thinking by computers.

This is the same technology that powers advancements like driverless cars or home assistants like the Amazon Alexa Echo Dot.

Although it currently only supports seven languages ​​- French, English, German, Italian, Polish, Dutch and Spanish – DeepL can supposedly learn and improve its language as it is used, and relies on a learning network created by the University of Montreal.

Journalists at Journal français The world recently put DeepL to the testcomparing it to other translation services available through Google, Bing, Yandex and Baidu search engines.

Traditional poetry, technical documents, newspaper articles, first-person writing and a report on a sports match were each compared between the different languages, in order to test the capabilities of the services.

Although they admitted that their tests were “far from exhaustive”, they still concluded that Google was still the far superior service in many respects, especially after the release of its new algorithm last year. last.

However, DeepL showed clear signs of improvement over time and was particularly good at translating from English to German, but had a little more trouble translating English to French.

DeepL was also better at translating rare words with more nuance, such as those seen in poetry, and first-person speech, and turns of phrase such as the English words “discuss these matters further” , which Google has incorrectly translated into French as “discuss these issues further», rather than the more correct «discuss these issues in more depthreturned by DeepL.

“Progress [in online translation] is real,” the testers concluded. “But it’s still easy to fool a machine translator, and even when the sentences are correct, the reader can still feel the ‘coldness’ of the machine.

“Online translators are still far from the capacity of human interpreters,” they said.